Optimal Sporting Recovery

We are regularly asked about optimal recovery methods following sport, especially in team tournament situations where players are expected to perform, day-after-day. Contact and dynamic sports combine high-intensity exercise with repeated, forceful movements causing soft tissue trauma, reduced muscle function and increased muscle soreness [1, 2]. Furthermore, impairments in athletic performance and increased injury rates reported following repeated competition [1, 3]. Effective recovery positively influences physiological and psychological mechanisms, enhancing preparedness for subsequent training and competition [1, 2]. This is partly due to accelerated rate and quality of muscle repair, counteracting the detrimental symptoms of soft tissue trauma [2].Read More

Clinical Pilates

Research published in 2011 defines Pilates as a mind–body exercise that encompasses strength, core stability, flexibility, muscle control, posture and breathing (Wells et al, 2012).

I have been a Physiotherapist now for 8 years, teaching Pilates for 2 years and playing National level hockey.  Below are some of my favourite parts of Pilates classes, both teaching and participating in them weekly.

–          The calmness that it brings to your body and breathing

–          The control you need to gain to improve and seeing the improvements

–          How much you begin to understand your body, its immobility, weaknesses and strengths

–          The challenge to move in ways you didn’t realise were possible

–          How daily life, postures, trainings, stressors can affect how we move

–          The balance it brings each day by taking time to be mindful and calm before returning to reality

–          Feeling my tummy and bum muscles working!!Read More