Optimal Sporting Recovery

We are regularly asked about optimal recovery methods following sport, especially in team tournament situations where players are expected to perform, day-after-day. Contact and dynamic sports combine high-intensity exercise with repeated, forceful movements causing soft tissue trauma, reduced muscle function and increased muscle soreness [1, 2]. Furthermore, impairments in athletic performance and increased injury rates reported following repeated competition [1, 3]. Effective recovery positively influences physiological and psychological mechanisms, enhancing preparedness for subsequent training and competition [1, 2]. This is partly due to accelerated rate and quality of muscle repair, counteracting the detrimental symptoms of soft tissue trauma [2].Read More

Athlete Strength & Conditioning Classes

As the season is coming to an end, it is time to start thinking about the off-season. There are a few questions worth asking yourself…..

  1. What are your plans to keep the fitness that you have gained and look great over summer?
  2. Did you have injuries this season that may have been prevented if you were stronger or fitter to start the season?
  3. Did your fitness or strength let you down this year?

Research shows us that approximately 60% of all injuries can be prevented with the correct conditioning and fitness training. The nature of sport with its explosive movements, repeated landings and sudden changes of direction means that injury risk is significantly increased. Our team has extensive experience in sports physiotherapy and understands the pressures that dynamic sport places on the body.

After a summer of sitting on our beautiful beaches, we need to ensure that your body is prepared for the pressures that our chosen sport places on the body. The body can be overloaded, increasing our risk of injury, if we place too much stress on getting fit and strong during the season.Read More

Clinical Pilates

Research published in 2011 defines Pilates as a mind–body exercise that encompasses strength, core stability, flexibility, muscle control, posture and breathing (Wells et al, 2012).

I have been a Physiotherapist now for 8 years, teaching Pilates for 2 years and playing National level hockey.  Below are some of my favourite parts of Pilates classes, both teaching and participating in them weekly.

–          The calmness that it brings to your body and breathing

–          The control you need to gain to improve and seeing the improvements

–          How much you begin to understand your body, its immobility, weaknesses and strengths

–          The challenge to move in ways you didn’t realise were possible

–          How daily life, postures, trainings, stressors can affect how we move

–          The balance it brings each day by taking time to be mindful and calm before returning to reality

–          Feeling my tummy and bum muscles working!!Read More